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August 26, 1938     The Jewish Transcript
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PAO. Two THE JEWISH TRANSCRIPT, SEATTLE AUGUST 26, Thought Of The Week "We live in the most cruel era of history. Fascism is attempting to destroy every trace of civilized reason and humanity that man has painfully evolved through the eons. One fights them grimly. They must be eliminated like a cancer, or life cannot go on. There is no compromise with cancer or with Fascism. But we ask ourselves, ,Can human beings become so twisted and diseased?&apos; The answer is: Man is not evil; he is only blind. I am sure that even in the Fascist lands, except for a small official caste of the religious hierarchs and the bandit-rulers of state and industry, the great masses do not celebrate the news that another Spanish or Chinese city has been bombed and hundreds of babies and their mothers murdered. Even the Fascist masses do not rejoice; indeed, the hierarchs and state rulers are careful to keep the full details from them. They cannot trust the human instincts still remaining in their own followers. Man is blind, not evil. I sometimes pity the dupes of Fascism, for they live in darkness. They have been led to believe that the murder and hate of their rulers is necessary for the nation. But history, that great surgeon, will yet operate and give them eyes."--MIKE GOLD, Writer. rGUST 26, tnchol Ki( Jewd RBIN (W. N ti-Jewish terr( G " Ilar(hsts V with the kidn, an, Jewish 1 the fourth J i recent year, :[hOugh heavy llof them, no Prod alivc. The 00lewish Transcript Combined with THE JEWISH CHRONICLE A Weekly Newspaper for the Jewish People of the Pacific Northwest 1616 8th Avenue, Seattle Phone MAin 2715 HERMAN A. HOROWITZ ........................ Editor and Publisher NXTItAS Kiw.Me ....................................... Associate Editor SiDm:r W. WEBnER .................................. Business Manager OFlnCt^L PnoToon^Pm:R ......... Waiters Studio, 4th and Pike Building A weekly pai)er devoted to the interests of the Jewish peaople of Washington, Idaho, Montana, British Columbia and Alaska. Entered as second class matter September 5, 1924, at the Post Office at Seattle, Washington, under the Act of March 3, 1879. Single Copies, 5 Cents. $2.00 per Year 38 VOL. XV. Friday, Aug. 26, 1938 No. 26 PATRIOTISM FIRST N the minds of many uninformed people, the Federal Govern- menus resettlement project at Hightstown, New Jersey, where some 200 Jewish needle trades workers from New York and Philadelphia have been settled in an agricultural-industrial community, is a radical colony. Some opponents of the New Deal have even gone so far as to denounce it as "Communistic." Anyone at all familiar with Jersey Homesteads, as the settlement is known, accepts this criticism as simply political talk with no foundation in fact. Sunday something happened in Jersey Homesteads that ought to put an end to such criticism. Jersey Homesteads was host to a great gathering of war veterans, civic leaders and representatives of patriotic organi- zations from all parts of the country, for that was the day selected for the installation of a local post of the Jewish War Veterans of the United States. Among the needle trades workers in the colony are a score of war veterans. It is significant that this colony of Jews selected a patriotic organization like the J. W. V as the first national body to be represented by a local unit at Jersey Homesteads The dedication of this post of the Jewish War Veterans is important for a number of reasons. First, it is an effective answer to the calumny that the colony is radical It also demonstrates that when Jews get to- gether in this country, one of the first things they think of is Americanism. And finally it reveals the high proportion of veterans among American Jews. Out of 200 families there are 22 veterans. IRISH AND JEWS VEN the most perfunctory reader of foreign news dispatches s by this time familiar with reports of this or that country or colony denying admission to refugees from Austria and Germany. The reasons vary but the result is the same. R It is, therefore, a heartening piece of news that the town of Newtownards in North Ireland recently turned out en masse to welcome 60 Austrian Jewish refugees who had come there as permanent settlers. Headed by Sir Basil McFarland, the High Sheriff, the Irish townsfolk paraded to the dock and escorted the Jewish emigres to their new home with a parade. In a brief address, Sir Basil emphasized that Ireland was confident that the Jewish newcomers would greatly benefit Ire- land just as the Huguenot refugees from France two centuries ago had benefited the Emerald Isle. The refugees had hardly put foot on Irish soil before they were busy organizing a factory for the manufacture of women's clothing and training Irish women in the art of designing, cutting and sewing milady's garments. There's an old tradition about the Irish and the Jew getting along well together wherever they are. The hearty welcome accorded the Austrian Jews in New- townards re-emphasizes this old friendship between the two peoples. REFUGEES MAKE JOBS NE of the objections most frequently cited by various coun- tries to the admission of German and Austrian refugees as permanent settlers is the allegation that they would take jobs away from natives. On the face of it this would seem to be a valid reason. But if we dig below the surface the facts do not justify it. Sir John Hope Simpson, one of the world's greatest experts on immigration, and a former vice-chairman of the Refugee Settlements Commission in Athens, reported to the Liberal Summer School at Oxford that 25,000 Englishmen have been given employment in business enterprises established by refugees in Great Britain. This figure, he said, is more than double the number of refugees admitted to England. Similar facts were recently revealed in Holland. If an objective investigation of the situation were made in other countries that have admitted substantial numbers of refugees, notably France, Belgium, Czechoslovakia, the United States and Argentina, we have no doubt that it would reveal that the emigres had contributed greatly to the economic prosperity of their new homelands. It is true, of course, that many of the refugees now seeking admission to other countries are almost penniless, having been robbed of their property before being sent to exile. But there are still some who have some capital with which to start life anew if given the opportunity. But even those who are without concrete means possess in- tangible capital such as knowledge of valuable industrial meth- ods, formulas, patent rights, etc., that will prove economically useful in countries with sufficient foresight to make their owners welcome. JEWISH CALENDAR Rosh Hodesh, Ellul .... Sun., Aug. 28 5699 - 1988 Rosh Hashonah, 1st day.Men., Sept. 26 RoshHashonah,2ndday.Tues.,Sept.27 Fast of Gedaliah ...... Wed., Sept. 28 Yore Kippur ............ Wed., Oct. 5 Succoth. 1st day ....... Men.. Oct. 10 Succoth, 2nd day ..... Tues., Oct. 11 Hosha'ana Rabba ...... Sun., Oct. 16 Shemini Atseret ....... Men., Oct. 17 Simchas Torah ........ Tues., Oct. 18 Marchesvan ........... Wed., Oct. 26 Kislev .............. Thurs., Nov. 24 Chanukah ............. Sun., Dec. 18 Tebeth ................. Fri., Dec. 23 Fast of Tebeth .......... Sun., Jan. 1 Book Review Whither Palestine! BOOKS:"Thy Neighbor" by Lord Meh!hett (11. C. l(insey & ('o.) . . . "A ,]oilrl(ey to Jerus'dem" by St. ,lohn Ervine (M.emillan Co.) .... "Three l)ceades of l'alestine" by l)r. Arthur Rul)pin (Shoclen Vertag, Jerusalem). REVIEWER : llem'y Montor, al)le, keen-min(hd young New York I)oo] c,'itie. COMMENT: It is difficult today to evade l'Mestine in discussing thc Jewish I)roblmn. Firstly, it assumes e(nnnmnding 1)rollorti(ms in any reas- onal)]e ai, teml)t to find h()mes for "Sul)erlluous" Jews. Secondly, it is a]rea(/y one of the major Jewish eom= muni(ies of the world, containing more Jews than arc in Austria, l;tvia, Belgium, It'lly nn(l Switzer- lan(l conibined, harb(Mng a .lewish l)Olnflation 'thnost e(lual t(i tliat which elm I)e found in (]re.l, Bri(>ain, North h'el',.nd and IAthuania. Many Jews, some i)r(nnl)(ed I)y sin- cerity, ()l, hers by m'tliee, are asldng: In l'alestine truly an o'tsis in a desert ()f Jewish (lliliression or is it, but a confusing mirage taunling l, he weary W;tllderer 9 To the babel of'voices rushing in t() IIl|svcer [hat qliestion have recent- ly been a(hled three b()t)ks, all sym- liatheti(: or lmssional.ely dev(il,e(l to LORD MELCHETT . . he was once a Christianl (,lie relluil(ling of the .lcwish Nal, ional IIome. All of them recognize the dif- fi('ulties but seem to have n(i doubts of a hal)l)y outcome. As a c(mcise, orderly, l)opular ex- l)osition of Jewish aims and accoml)- lishment in Palestine no English l)ook l)ublished exceeds in al)peal Lord Melchett's study of tl)e Jewish llrol)lem an(1 its sohl(,ion which he calls "Thy Neighbor." Born into the Episcol)al Church, the young Lord Mclchett, folh)wing the exanll)le of his late father, Alfred Mond, l)as not merely returned t(i Judaism but has embraced Zionism with a fervor and an intvlligenee which match that of the most veteran Zionist lcaders. His having been a Christian is, fascinatingly enmigh, explicit in the tone of the entire book. There in neither SUl)l)li'mee nor al)ology in LoM Melchet('s account of Jewish I)crsccution an(1 of the Jewish at- temllt t(i resist th't burdcn through the erea(,ion (if a nal, ional, in(le- l)ende.nt life in Palestine. The forthrightness in LoM Mel- chett's arguments is a refreshing de- llartu,'e from much of Zionist docu- mentation. Lord Melchett surveys the pano- rama of Jewish life and decides that hopelessness is the lot of at least 6,500,00(I Jews in tyranny-ruh;d na- tions in Eurol)e. For most (if these he wants lllacc made in 1)alestine. lle reiterates the frequently-heaM demand for a htrge h)an under League (if Natio,)s ausllices which will ac- celerate the slow teml)o of Jewish mi- gratiou into Palestine. Lm'(I Mehdl(;tt's e'flm prose is in strikhlg contrast to the. hysteria (if a number ()f American residents in l'ah;stine who fled Tel Aviv when the first I)ullets were he'u'd over (.lie Pl:dns of Esracl(ni in 1936. These Americans, ]miring to find in thc DR. ARTHUR RUPPIN .. he is most competent to speakl slrtcious (()mfor(.able l)orders of Tel- Aviv "t nulr(: llrofil.abh: ((n'ner (if New Y(irk, llecame (.error-stri(den when tim thought was l)r(mgh(> home to thenl that l)a]estine is f(ir pi(ineers and not f(ir gold llrOsliect(irs. l,o)'(I Mel(diett's f'dlJl in ]'fis Zion- isni should :lls(i give pause t(i Jews hnlger :lss()eial.ed with Zi(niism who, set(Jing the fate of nations over their ()(iron.t-Corona cigars, h.tve lie, tided (hat the Jewish llomelan(I will never I)e realized I)eeaus( its I)uihling en- tails (.he loss of lives and l)rol)erl,y. l,or(l Mel(dmtt slie.ds wi(h sin- cerity an(l franl<ness, th(mgh some (if his obserwti(nls must, I)e disquieting (,() any (nle wondering whe(,her the price for Jewish setthmmnt in l'Mes- l, ine nius(, I)e a strong military an(1 naval base at llaifa l.(i se.rvc the life- Ibm (If the B,'tish emliirc. But what about l,hc Aralis? What- ever (.lie ex(,(mt of ,lewish suffering in Eur(lllcan countries which (lcinands 'ts elenmnl;ary jusl;ice tile (',reati(in of a haven in l'alestine--does tt,at jusiify l.he del)riv:lt, ion (if ArM) rights? Arabs may I)elieve it or not, but th(ise questi(ms are asked m(n'e by ,Jews th.ui t)y .uly other gr(n H) of peol)le. That they do so is a tribute to their i).tssion for social justice. But at l,imes it is a token of their ne, uroti(: self-('(nMemnation. The best 'ulswer to pro-Arab Prof. William E,'nest llockiug's sawge ehamllions]fil) of the 'q'(nmul(;c >'' (if Arab overlo,'dship of l).l]estine is sup- lilied by St. John Erviue in "A Journey to Jervsalem." At times Ervine errs (nl the side of jocularity, but his reinltr](s Oil l)alestin(; are free of the stiifl[iness and bh)atcd serious- =FAR FROM THE MADDING CROWD' iless of the average trltvel IteeOllllt. ()f the three, b(l(iks, ])rllnlatist St. John ]]rvine,)s is most ell]eulatc(I to In'ovi(]e entcrtainnlent. Rncing a(WOSS its nlany subjects its pop into his head, El'viii( , ]ias piled l)hih)so- 1)hy, religion, science, history an(I l)lain good humor ;nto his 360 l)ages which seems too short. it is iml)(irtant to cml)hasize this quality in Erviuc in (n'dcr to al)- ln'eci'tte wh,tt lie sltys 'diout the Arabs. If he dislnisses theni (!urtly nlid scenlingly brut't]]y it is merely it rca(',ti(ni against the silly scnti- nmntldisnl with which (he Arab case is usa][y llrescnted. The Aral)s have ,'t right in Palestine tIS ]lulnan beings requiring Ol)lior- tunil,y and freedon. Their right is similar to thitt of the ,lows'. But too ninny ()f the Arab ehiHn- liions h)ve 1.() siln])(!r abollt the "sinl- lilicity, '' the "l'onlancc, ) t]ie "ghun- (ii"' of tho Aral)s as though thltt is lilly roconll)(Hlse for tr,choina rick- el.s) niisl;i'y. These same (,hanl])iolis (ondelnn the "Oeci(hmtal industry ') with which Jews ill'(! "Sl)oiling the scenery. ' After a shar 1) dissection of T. E. Iawronce, FA'vine relnarl(s that "he did ns all it (lisscrvice when lie set us senthnen(,Mizing al)out Aral)s... When I hear tin Englishm,m soliti- inentalJzing l/I)ou| lhe ]loble Arllbs and reineml)er lhe dirty, inefl+ieient ,tnd greedy lmksheesh-hunters I saw w]ierever ] wenl. 1 feel rii.ge rising within nie. "These imoph; will l)i'aise the ArM) :till1 belitth' (,]it Jew nlere,]y, SO far aS cad discover, be(Hl]Se the Jew is in- dustrious, enterprising and adult, and unwilling to be patronized like it li(:t dog, whereas th(; Arall II'tl;Lers the Eur()l)('an's s2nse of his ()wn su= l)cri(n'ity by lil'ying the imrt of the hell)less nonlad, the simple child of the desort;, thc melting-eyed infant who will alhlw t,hc big, strong Eng- lishnili, n l,() |,like (are of hhil! )' Of the three ailt]iors) the (ill() most COml)etont to sl)eak on t,he actual proi)lenls is ])r. Arthur Rul)pin ) agrononlist and e(!ononlist who, 30 ye'trs ago, came (.o I)alestine, 'is the l)ionee, r of Jewish national coloniza- tion. ][e is just as hol)cfu] today as lle wns then, even though he, has tiad nlore ilitinlate conta(t with the ])an(lieal)S a11(l the, ol)st'tch)s than virtually every other Zionist leader. "Three l)c(mdes of P.destinC' is it coml)ilation of the sl)eeches and l)al)ers of l)r. l{ul)l)hi. It has be, e,n transl'tted into English 1)y Maurice Siimu,<;l. In its 1)Itges one hlts (;lie history ()f the Zionist inovenl3nt fronl the hiside. It is i;he story of Zionist d()ubf, %nd Jn(le(lsi(ni, ()f exi)eriinent lind SllC- eess of the.ory an(1 reitlity. Dr. .By BRESSI.ER kidnal)l)ing (: fince the Mal Sll)l)l'essc(l ?al)cr and 1,o( .f the m(n'c vi estations. RUl)l)in ]ias lnuch to say that C equ:dly shocMng to Zionists a] ane .] Zionis(s for lie is uncomproir .re Ki honest with himsolf and towl ln'olllems he is called ulmn solve. UTTGART, ( What he h'Ls to say about , both of th, fensive manners ()f well-to-d( il 16 ldlh;d l in Ameriea 'rod ehmwhere w Czechosh:)wd< ldl)i(.zers on the sidelines n a cloud llanl typic d of his frankness of expr 'd ' against li B1 (Col)yright, 1937). lde near Obcr e A BOOK: "Twilight Of A WorI[(i . merl.cans v l,'r.u,z Wcrfel. Vil, ing l'ress, [t:!d. M()rltz AI,( . iV(]'iV been f] oln REVIEWER: Charles S. ] " ' Seattle corl)oration lawyer, c ]. lite an(t vor.eious reader. OMMENT: lnevitill)ly th ing l)ul)lic in (loonled to l;avet on it I)y (;lie alithor of OliC stlll I)ook rel)rints of hereloforo uilll alid nie(liocre 1)ro(hietions. Wcrfel's "Forty Days of Musa] is resl)ons[I)]e for t]ie 6(,)2 pages "Twilight ()f A Worhl," prd eight stories an(1 a 40-1)age c tory l)rologne, Ml of which are niore su|licicnt in (|lntntity (iuality. Five ()f thenl never sip, v tho l: light ()f (lay, allhough writtell ( long i)eriod of (;lie allthor)8  n.nd it was not until ho rcalif (he 1)Ol)Uliu.ity of <llSii, |)ag ll he fecl t]iat tho English sP l)eol)lcs would be induced to lbi, 60, G( !I Sing Pri W YORK 0 a0nth on a ll: growing o '( Some (if his I ia the c 0,i0 from New lile (if l)erfor i Zeide M. S(', t]tlS Week "WITS l risen for thr ral Sessions (: Not(,, Jr. i Schmelhle er(t, 38, Wit,' Years on th( Persec! YORK (V great-griu as anlong 11 on the. S. 200 wcre but Miss pianist liot a g EL' She is g(ii ill her father. FRANZ WERFEL . . more quantity than qtil ize the literary efforts that i man h.td made no definite impre; The stories cover (,lie imtc "1 days in Auslria, arc highly ir t (,iv(;, sl)eculative, metal)hysiclil h)sol)hic'd and spiritualistie show nono of the maturity, c01 ity or power ()f his one succeSS' Werfcl's bid for a l)laco in tl (if F'line wouht havo 1)een the proliably accepted had lie not this llook to his prolmsal. Tho soldiers fight and the kif heroes. Mental attitude 1its more !l t with SlICCCSS thall lllelltltl cap llIJI f Tontorrow is ei(her the 1 'c, " . 'tl 1)unishment for today's actl'4 lie who is able to ,tttcnd' gogue,, and neglects to do so, i neighbor. Nazi L( Unl YORK--C Cate of natu Winter recently cot lity charge, eek to the In rald l). Reil d States Del )i terscheidt, s qlalidist in ]; t(], Was (',onvi( 011 l/ charge ( :lc 27, aiid ( to Serve fi Years i,l a eiitiary, ol J(liie' 26, Id eonvictioll , ltaturalizati( Oo You .-. KNu 00_Je , je ardiff C According to tradition, the ,  ..... ?!i: !'?i :!'! iiii!!i?}' )he2: '(i 'lW::: ': ; ' . "' ' e tlhi anifest had served with the Roman le!|vi_,14 ()f anti. selected boautiful Jewish w'|ill'!lhhn'es,clt, t is is t]lcir llortion ()f the spoi s and .|,,. " Week (( them to their quallters on thc li,' ty' ' ' and the Main and there coIl lv,foot signs with them. Theh' children vcr0 (I) and I)eiti.i ed as Jews by their mothers, I titl e Yilll)()ls wet 0e , the founders of the Jowish coIll l di ef Jewish ties between Worms and /[tt)' i strict, whe legend has it. }atioli ives -'U)bi l-r " ,.u ,avo .,.I eo.vcrted a: <the00, callse you have silenco(1 him. ,. , i, ,, 'llllt I. v it ri(i" .-as (tev lie I it w(nft l{q hut will . )l Jerevitcl (: hiiu they PWer to sul: 1 h WISE :%. sU, id t9 C9 !% a. the Street lqil 'e ia need, -'l, , Driest and i ' Ithiiud.